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Wietmarschen, H. van, B. Tjaden, M. van Vliet, M.C.E. Battjes-Fries, M.C. Jong. 2018. Effects of mindfulness training on perceived stress, self-compassion, and self-reflection of primary care physicians: a mixed-methods study. BJGP Open. 27 Nov 2018.


DOI: 10.3399/bjgpopen18X101621

Soort document: Journal Article

Download full text pdf, 340 kB; opent in nieuw venster

Meer over auteurs/freelancers verbonden aan het LBI :
Dr. Ir. Marieke C.E. Battjes-Fries;
Dr. Miek C. Jong ;
drs. Marja van Vliet;
Dr. Herman van Wietmarschen


Taal van het document: Engels

Title in English: Effects of mindfulness training on perceived stress, self-compassion, and self-reflection of primary care physicians: a mixed-methods study

Abstract / summary in English:

Background
Primary care physicians are subjected to a high workload, which can lead to stress and a high incidence of burnout. A mindfulness training course was developed and implemented for primary care physicians to better cope with stress and improve job functioning.

Aim
To gain insight into the effects of the mindfulness training on perceived stress, self-compassion, and self-reflection of primary care physicians.

Design & setting
A pragmatic mixed-methods pre–post design in which physicians received 8 weeks of mindfulness training.

Method
Participants completed validated questionnaires on perceived stress (Perceived Stress Scale [PSS]), self-compassion (Self-Compassion Scale [SCS]), and self-reflection (Groningen Reflection Ability Scale [GRAS]) before the training, directly after, and 6 months later. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with six participants after the training and a content analysis was performed to gain in depth understanding of experiences.

Results
A total of 54 physicians participated in the study. PSS was reduced (mean difference [MD] -4.5, P<0.001), SCS improved (MD = 0.5, P<0.001), and GRAS improved (MD = 3.3, P<0.001), directly after the 8-week training compared with before training. Six months later, PSS was still reduced (MD = -2.9, P = 0.025) and SCS improved (MD = 0.7, P<0.001). GRAS did not remain significant (MD = 2.5, P = 0.120). Qualitative analysis revealed four themes: being more aware of their own feelings and thoughts; being better able to accept situations; experiencing more peacefulness; and having more openness to the self and others.

Conclusion
Mindfulness training might be an effective approach for improving stress resilience, self-compassion, and self-reflection in primary care physicians


Keywords in English: primary health care, general practice, general practitioners, mindfulness, stress, resilience
Effects of mindfulness training on perceived stress, self-compassion, and self-reflection of primary care physicians: a mixed-methods study